Seventh Circuit Busts Plaintiffs for “Judge Shopping,” Vacates and Remands Second Case to Be Reassigned to the Original Judge

In Ewing v. Carrier, No. 21-2890 (7th Cir. May 25, 2022), the Seventh Circuit skips a decision on the merits of a fraud and breach or contract case, finding that it was related to a pending case and should not have been filed as a new matter in front of a second judge. It vacatesContinue reading “Seventh Circuit Busts Plaintiffs for “Judge Shopping,” Vacates and Remands Second Case to Be Reassigned to the Original Judge”

Class Counsel Incurs Seventh Circuit Criticism for Calling Objector’s Counsel A “Notorious Professional Objector” in a Brief

In Petri v. Stericycle, Inc. No. 20-2055 (7th Cir. May 19, 2022), the Seventh Circuit vacates and remands a 25% class-action fee award in a securities case, ordering reconsideration of evidence that lead class counsel benefitted from prior litigation and other factors, and—in a parting shot—criticizes lead counsel for going after the objector’s lawyer individuallyContinue reading “Class Counsel Incurs Seventh Circuit Criticism for Calling Objector’s Counsel A “Notorious Professional Objector” in a Brief”

Third Party Could Not Intervene in Settled Individual Civil Rights Case to Turn It into a Rule 23 Class Action, Seventh Circuit Holds

In Ali v. City of Chicago, No. 21-1536 (7th Cir. May 17, 2022), the Seventh Circuit holds that a district court did not abuse its discretion by refusing to grant Fed. R. Civ. P. 24 intervention into an existing but settled individual § 1983 claim with the intention of converting it into a Fed. R. Civ.Continue reading “Third Party Could Not Intervene in Settled Individual Civil Rights Case to Turn It into a Rule 23 Class Action, Seventh Circuit Holds”

Pro Hac Vice Admission Fees Are Not a Taxable Cost Under 28 U.S.C. § 1920, Holds Seventh Circuit

In Canter v.  AT&T Umbrella Benefit Plan, No. 21-1514 (7th Cir. May 11, 2022), the Seventh Circuit holds in an issue of first impression in the circuit that a prevailing defendant may not tax pro hac vice admission fees for out-of-state lawyers as a “cost” under Fed. R. Civ. P. 54(d) and 28 U.S.C. §Continue reading “Pro Hac Vice Admission Fees Are Not a Taxable Cost Under 28 U.S.C. § 1920, Holds Seventh Circuit”

Fed. R. Civ. P. 27 Pre-Filing Deposition Is Not a Vehicle for Jurisdictional Discovery, Holds Seventh Circuit

In Qin v. Deslongchamps, No. 21-1873 (7th Cir. Apr. 14, 2022), the Seventh Circuit affirms the denial of a petition to take a Fed. R. Civ. P. 27 deposition of a member of a limited liability corporation (LLC) to ascertain their citizenship before filing a diversity suit in federal court. For federal diversity purposes, LLCsContinue reading “Fed. R. Civ. P. 27 Pre-Filing Deposition Is Not a Vehicle for Jurisdictional Discovery, Holds Seventh Circuit”

Another Court of Appeals Has to Write an Opinion Reminding Litigants That Fed. R. Evid. 702 Applies to Nearly All Cases in Federal Court Involving Expert Testimony

In Love v. United States, No. 20-3534 (7th Cir. Nov. 4, 2021), the Seventh Circuit issues a short opinion devoted entirely to knocking down an argument that state rather than federal expert-witness evidence rules apply to a case governed by state law. This mirrors a recent Second Circuit opinion from October 6, 2021. Plaintiff VargasContinue reading “Another Court of Appeals Has to Write an Opinion Reminding Litigants That Fed. R. Evid. 702 Applies to Nearly All Cases in Federal Court Involving Expert Testimony”

Seventh Circuit Criticizes District Court’s Delay in Issuing Its Merits Opinion Months After Ordering Dismissal of the Case, Citing Fed. R. App. P. 4(a)(7)(A)(ii)

In The Association of American Physicians & Surgeons v. American Board of Medical Specialties, No. 20-3072 (7th Cir. Oct. 10., 2021), affirming dismissal of an antitrust complaint brought under § 1 of the Sherman Act, the Seventh Circuit criticizes the district court’s delay in issuing the final opinion—a practice that in other circumstances cold “risk[]Continue reading “Seventh Circuit Criticizes District Court’s Delay in Issuing Its Merits Opinion Months After Ordering Dismissal of the Case, Citing Fed. R. App. P. 4(a)(7)(A)(ii)”

Seventh Circuit Discusses “Nerve Center” Test for Diversity Jurisdiction as Applied to Corporate Subsidiaries

In Big Shoulders Capital LLC v. San Luis & Rio Grande Rd., No. 20-1503 (7th Cir. Sept. 3, 2021), the court remands a diversity action to determine whether the subsidiaries of a railroad – under the “nerve center” test – are citizens (1) of Illinois where the parent is headquartered, or (2) of Oregon, Delaware,Continue reading “Seventh Circuit Discusses “Nerve Center” Test for Diversity Jurisdiction as Applied to Corporate Subsidiaries”

Tenth Circuit Holds That a Single Phone Call That the Debtor Didn’t Even Answer Created Standing Under the FDCPA, Breaking with the Seventh Circuit

In a blog entry dated December 16, 2020, I summarized five decisions by the Seventh Circuit that dramatically crimped Article III standing in Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) cases. In yesterday’s decision, Lupia v. Medicredit, No. 20-1294 (10th Cir. Aug. 17, 2021), the Tenth Circuit expressly rejects the Seventh Circuit’s approach and holds thatContinue reading “Tenth Circuit Holds That a Single Phone Call That the Debtor Didn’t Even Answer Created Standing Under the FDCPA, Breaking with the Seventh Circuit”

Seventh Circuit Affirms Remand of City’s Royalty Lawsuit Against Video Streaming Services Back to State Court, Based on “Comity Abstention”

In City of Fishers, Indiana v. DIRECTTV, No.20-3478 (7th Cir. July 21, 2021), the Seventh Circuit holds that a suit involving “state taxation of commercial activity” belonged in state court, and should not have been removed to federal court, under the seldom-invoked “comity abstention” doctrine. This action was brought under Indiana’s Indiana Video Service FranchisesContinue reading “Seventh Circuit Affirms Remand of City’s Royalty Lawsuit Against Video Streaming Services Back to State Court, Based on “Comity Abstention””